9/11/2020 The Wizard Nebula

This was shot with my 11″ SCT, Hyperstar, ASI 294 MC Pro, and L-eNhance narrowband filter.

NGC 7380 (also known as the Wizard Nebula) is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787. William Herschel included his sister’s discovery in his catalog, and labelled it H VIII.77. It is also known as 142 in the 1959 Sharpless catalog (Sh2-142). This reasonably large nebula is located in Cepheus. It is extremely difficult to observe visually, usually requiring very dark skies and an O-III filter.
Located 7200 light years away, the Wizard nebula, surrounds developing open star cluster NGC 7380. Visually, the interplay of stars, gas, and dust has created a shape that appears to some like a fictional medieval sorcerer. The active star forming region spans about 100 light years, making it appear larger than the angular extent of the Moon. The Wizard Nebula can be located with a small telescope toward the constellation of the King of Aethiopia (Cepheus). Although the nebula may last only a few million years, some of the stars being formed may outlive our Sun.

9/6/2020 The Pinwheel Galaxy

This was taken with my 11″ SCT, Hyperstar, ASI 294 MC Pro, and Optolong L-Pro filter to reduce light pollution.

The Pinwheel Galaxy (also known as Messier 101, M101 or NGC 5457) is a face-on spiral galaxy distanced 21 million light-years (six megaparsecs) away from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain on March 27, 1781 and was communicated to Charles Messier, who verified its position for inclusion in the Messier Catalogue as one of its final entries.

8/22/2020 The Omega Nebula in Sagittarius

This was shot with my 11″ SCT, Hyperstar, ASI294MC Pro, and an Optolong L-Enhance narrowband filter. 40 60 second images were stacked to make this.

The Omega Nebula, also known as the Swan Nebula, Checkmark Nebula, and the Horseshoe Nebula (catalogued as Messier 17 or M17 or NGC 6618) is an H II region in the constellation Sagittarius. It was discovered by Philippe Loys de Chéseaux in 1745. Charles Messier catalogued it in 1764. It is located in the rich starfields of the Sagittarius area of the Milky Way.